Letting go of your business could be the best thing you do

I grew up going to summer camps. One summer, I went to five summer camps. (Yes, I was even a big enough nerd to go to Yearbook Camp.) But, I loved camps. It was always so easy for me to just say bye and run off to do whatever we were doing first. That wasn't the case for everyone. There always seemed to be a few kids that couldn't handle leaving their parents, so they cried and secluded themselves for the first two days. Eventually, they came around and realized that camp was awesome, and they could survive without their parents for a few days. 

I grew up going to summer camps. One summer, I went to five summer camps. (Yes, I was even a big enough nerd to go to Yearbook Camp.) But, I loved camps. It was always so easy for me to just say bye and run off to do whatever we were doing first. That wasn't the case for everyone. There always seemed to be a few kids that couldn't handle leaving their parents, so they cried and secluded themselves for the first two days. Eventually, they came around and realized that camp was awesome, and they could survive without their parents for a few days.

It may have been hard for my parents to "let me go" and send me off to camp as an 8-year-old. But, they knew it was going to be good for me. The results of going to camp every year for 10+ years? Very independent (hello? I run my own business!), and I literally have friends all over the U.S. There are more examples of the benefits of me going to camps all those years, but that's not the point of this blog post. 

So, why am I telling you all this?

Because letting go of your business could be the best thing you ever do for it.

I think as entrepreneurs, most of us tend to hold onto our businesses like it's our baby. (Because it feels like it!) Now, I'm not a mother, but most mom's I know are very particular about the food they serve their children, where they go to school, etc. - because they believe they know what's best for their children. Except when the children get sick, and then they go to a doctor who knows just how to help the children. Even though you think you know what's best for your logo or website, you should talk to a professional designer.

Moving forward in your business

You've decided that you need to upgrade your business - either to have your clip-art logo re-designed by a professional, to re-design your website from 2005, or to update that brochure you created in Microsoft Publisher.

The first step? Finding a designer. You find a designer you like, sign the contract and get to work. But then, you're 20 drafts down in the logo process and wondering, "Am I too picky?"

Well,

  1. Maybe.
  2. You may need to just let go. You're used to what your logo / website / brochure has been, and it was comfortable. Trust the designer - they are (or should be) well-informed and well-trained to help you. 

This is not to say that you can't provide your designer with feedback, or work collaboratively with your designer. But, instead of being a "helicopter mom" and holding onto your business with white knuckles, be open to see the designer's ideas. Remember that a designer has been trained, and has experience to work with you. 

Think about why you are wanting the change. 

  • Clip-art logo? A graphic designer has the skills to create a professional logo to make your business look credible
  • Out-of-date website? A web designer can help re-design your website that attracts and converts more of your audience.

This process is why it's SO important to find the right designer - one who has a style that matches yours, one who communicates with you, and one whose personality you are comfortable with. Ask your designer questions before you sign a contract to work with them. It's not all on the designer though, you have to be willing to let go (even if just a little).

What hesitations do you have about letting go of your business?