Why brand consistency is important for your business

Branding your business or organization is so important. It's creating a name for yourself, usually with the help of a symbol or design that identifies and differentiates you from your competitors. 

Most people would say that your brand is built around your logo. The font(s) and color(s) used in your logo should flow through your website, your marketing collateral, packaging, etc. Everything you communicate visually and verbally is part of your brand.

Most people would say that your brand is built around your logo. The font(s) and color(s) used in your logo should flow through your website, your marketing collateral, packaging, etc. Everything you communicate visually and verbally is part of your brand.

But, is there such thing as being redundant in your branding?

Is using the same color palette and fonts boring? Is it wrong to try and be consistent with your use of graphics and imagery?

No.

Strong, consistent branding leads to a strong brand credibility.  Credibility adds value to your company's products or services that allows you to potentially charge more for your brand. 

You WANT people to know your brand. You want them to see your brand's color somewhere else and think of YOU. For instance, ever notice how the off-brand Dr. Pepper soda is the same color as Dr. Pepper? They did that because consumers relate the maroon color to Dr. Pepper, but might opt to buy the cheaper alternative (unless you are incredibly brand loyal, like me... love my Diet Dr. Pepper).

That's not to say that everything you put out needs to be completely one color. Many businesses have a style guide, complete with a color palette, appropriate fonts to be used, and variations of how the logo can be used. Take for instance, a client of mine, Unique Venues. This is their secondary color palette:

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These colors are what should be used outside of their main brand colors, red and gray. We incorporate these colors, as needed, into their marketing collateral. The variety of colors available helps their collateral from looking too bland, but cohesive, if you were to line up several of their pieces.

You don't have to be fancy, just consistent. Create a style guide if you don't have one. Create templates if you don't have some – for print pieces, for social media, for blogs, etc. Integrate your brand into everything. While this post focuses on the design aspect of your brand, there's more to it than just that. Your brand has a voice. As I said earlier, everything you communicate visually and verbally is part of your brand. Your copy and your imagery should match. Whether you're friendly and chatty, glamorous and ritzy, humorous and laid back – it's your brand. Own it, and use it.

See more on this topic from Ben Arment. 

Not sure how to get started on a style guide? Let me help you.